sl26mi

November 28, 2009

Sugar: The Bitter Truth – Prof Lustig, Univ Calif (YouTube video ~ 1.5 hours of lecture)

Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 2:30 am

SL

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October 17, 2009

60pc of doctors don’t wash hands

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http://au.news.yahoo.com/a/-/australian-news/6231695/60pc-of-doctors-don-t-wash-hands/

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October 16, 2009

The Paleo Diet Is an Anti-Inflammatory Diet (The Paleo Diet Update v5, #42)

Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 9:01 pm

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  • The Paleo Diet Update

    www.ThePaleoDiet.com
    Loren Cordain, Ph.D.
    Issue: # 2009 – 42 / October 16, 2009

    Stephen,

    Hello! Welcome to The Paleo Diet Update, our review of scientifically based news explaining how you can change your diet to protect your health.

    Did you know that diseases as diverse as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, allergies, asthma, gout and autoimmune diseases have something in common? These diseases, along with aging-related complaints, are all associated with inflammation.

    Emulating the diet of the Paleolithic period, which accounts for almost all of human evolution, eliminates many of the sources of such chronic inflammation that have been linked to most, if not all, modern diseases.

    In this issue, we take a look at how chronic inflammation can spread damage throughout the body leading to various diseases. We'll also share tips on how to help you transform recipes to be Paleo.

    Thanks to Maelán Fontes and Pablo Martinez Ramirez, this update is also available in Spanish.

    Enjoy.

    Wiley

    Loren Cordain, Ph.D.

    In This Issue

    Converting Recipes to Be Paleo
        The Paleo Diet Is an Anti-Inflammatory Diet             by Wiley Long

    Each organ, and even the bloodstream, contains a part of our immune system, which uses inflammation to protect us from bacteria, viruses, parasites, molds and foreign proteins as well as to heal wounds. Ideally, such threats are neutralized and the associated inflammation is resolved.

    An unresolved inflammatory response (chronic inflammation), however, can spread damage throughout the body. Researchers from different areas of medicine have independently and repeatedly concluded that inflammation plays a key role in a variety of illnesses.

    “I am a chiropractic doctor working in a multi-specialty setting (with physical therapists, several medical physicians [orthopedic surgery, spine neurosurgery, internal medicine, pain management] and acupuncture). I have been in practice since 1982. I have read The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet for Athletes as well as other publications by authors who are generally in concert with what I guess we could call Paleo-principles. My diet is the Paleo Diet.

    For patients who claim to have tried everything in pursuit of chronic pain relief, addressing underlying pro-inflammatory dietary practices can be a fundamental key to recovery. The Paleo Diet can be the key that unlocks the door to sustained pain relief.

    Many of my patients suffer from chronic pain and the principles of the Paleo Diet are valuable as it is essentially an anti-inflammatory diet. For instance, chronic pain sufferers who attempt to combat symptoms without addressing underlying omega-3 versus omega-6 imbalances from over reliance on grains and lack of animal sources of DHA and EPA, are fighting an uphill battle. The same can be said for foods with high glycemic indices that also have a pro-inflammatory effect.”

    Robb R.

    How the Paleo Diet diet relieved chronic pain

    Adopting the Paleo Diet resulted in both pain relief and improved athletic performance for a patient working with Dr. Russell. An endurance athlete in his mid-50s suffered from persistent back pain due, in part, to two degenerated lumbar discs. He was beginning to make some improvement in spinal pain with some specific Flexion-Distraction Mobilization (chiropractic treatments) and exercises.

    Dr. Russell also suggested The Paleo Diet for Athletes as an anti-inflammatory diet based on the patient’s athletic endeavors and the inflammatory nature of his psoriasis.

    The patient’s pain improved more rapidly than expected, and his recovery time was rapid and with far less physical discomfort than he had experienced previously. As a bonus, the patient judged his athletic performance to also be improved.

    Connection between inflammation and Alzheimer's disease identified

    Inflammation is involved in almost every disease process, and reducing chronic inflammation is often found to be therapeutic. Neurologists have also reported an inverse relationship between anti-inflammatory medications and Alzheimer's disease. In 1997, the journal Neurology published findings that people who had been regularly taking anti-inflammatory medicine had much lower rates of Alzheimer's disease.1

    As recently as September of 2009, the journal Gerontology published a study linking neuroinflammation with the development of several central nervous system diseases, including late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.2

    Link between chronic inflammation and cancer found

    Other researchers have also connected inflammation with cancer. The journal Cell published a study that identified a basic cellular mechanism that may link chronic inflammation with cancer.

    The researchers identified a protein called p100 as allowing communication between inflammation and cancer development processes.3 Chronic inflammation might lead to unrestrained cancer development.3

    Chronic inflammation associated with heart attack and stroke

    In 2003, the American Heart Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a joint statement associating inflammatory markers (such as C-reactive protein or CRP) with coronary heart disease and stroke. CRP is one of the acute phase proteins to increase during systemic inflammation.

    The statement was based on evidence implicating inflammation as a key factor in atherosclerosis.4 That’s the process of fatty deposit build up in arteries. High levels of hs-CRP consistently predict recurrent coronary events in cases of unstable angina and heart attack.4 Higher hs-CRP levels are also associated with the likelihood of an artery reclosing following balloon angioplasty, and lower survival rates.4 High levels of hs-CRP also predict prognosis and recurrent events for stroke and peripheral arterial disease.4

    Leaky-gut syndrome linked to chronic inflammation

    Increased intestinal permeability, also known as leaky-gut syndrome, can affect overall health by allowing passage of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the intestinal lumen into peripheral circulation.

    LPS comes from the cell walls of resident gram negative gut bacteria, and is one of the most potent pro-inflammatory antigens known.5 Increased passage of LPS into circulation induces pro-inflammatory cytokines (communication proteins of the immune system) leading to low-grade chronic inflammation.

    Dietary saponins from potatoes, beans, and legumes induce a leaky gut,6, 7 as do dietary lectins, alcohol, and NSAIDS. Lectins survive cooking and processing, as well as digestive enzymatic degradation, so they arrive in circulation intact in physiological concentrations to activate the immune system. Lectins are also able to increase E. coli and gram-negative bacteria overgrowth in the intestinal lumen.8

    Why the Paleo Diet is an anti-inflammatory diet

    Returning to the diet that humans evolved to eat addresses many underlying pro-inflammatory modern dietary practices. The Paleo Diet corrects the pro-inflammatory effects of omega-63:/omega-6 3 fatty acid imbalance that can result from consumption of vegetable oils, grain-based products, and a lack of DHA and EPA from animal sources.

    The diet also eliminates other modern food products that have been implicated in the inflammatory basis of disease, such asincluding dairy products, refined sugar, and lectins. Lectins are found in beans, grains, and legumes, which are not part of the Paleo Diet. found in grains and legumes.

    While the diet also excludes processed foods (such as refined or hydrogenated vegetable oils in margarines, potato chips and baked goods that can be pro-inflammatory), it does include olive oil. This highly mono-unsaturated oil can actually reduce inflammation. The high-fiber content of the diet also helps to reduce inflammation.

    In addition, foods with high glycemic indices also have a pro-inflammatory effect. The low glycemic load foods of the Paleo Diet avoids such high-glycemic foodsaddress this , which also helps to lower insulin levels, and help to maintain optimum weight.

    Next time, we’ll take a look at the many aspects of the Paleo Diet that reduce your risk of disease to improve mental and physical function in later life. We'll also share ideas on how to keep Paleo when dining in Japanese restaurants.

              Converting Recipes to Be Paleo             by Nell Stephenson
    One of the most frequent questions I’m asked is ‘what are your favorite Paleo recipes?’ This really catches me off-guard because ALL the meals I cook, whether I use a recipe or not, are Paleo!

    I’m certainly not implying that all the cookbooks out there are designated Paleo books. It’s just that it’s not that hard to convert a recipe to conform to Paleo foods!

    Maybe you can’t use your Mom’s Betty Crocker cookbook from 1953 and figure out a way to make the perfect yellow cake while keeping Paleo, but if we’re talking about main dishes, it’s not so hard to stay Paleo.

    Here are a few tips to help you transform a recipe, which may have some very non-Paleo origins.

    If a recipe calls for butter to sauté, replace that with olive oil. If you’re working with recipes that call for a really high temperature, try grape seed oil because that has a higher burning point than olive oil.

    A recipe utilizing cheese as a topping or garnish is easily changed; too. If it’s a soup or stew, try shredded green or red cabbage on top. The crunch makes a nice balance to the soft texture of a stew.

    If you’ve found a great sauce recipe that seems Paleo, and then realized that you won’t have pasta for the sauce, worry no more. Just use baked spaghetti squash for pasta. It’s delicious with a homemade marinara that includes some diced grilled chicken!

    A recipe using flour as a thickener can sometimes be altered with the substitution of almond meal. Be open-minded because the flavor will obviously be a bit different.

    A main dish that was meant to be served on top of rice or pasta can easily be served over a bed of steamed kale, chard, spinach or collard greens, to name a few.

    Try using coconut milk in lieu of dairy milk in recipes. Again, the flavor and fat content may be a bit different, but change can be good.

    I purposely make each meal different from the last to ensure the most variety in my diet. I’ll prepare chicken one night, salmon the next, bison the following day, and so on, always making enough so that I have leftovers the next day for lunch.

    As I’ve said many times, keep it interesting and literally play in the kitchen! Find what works, what doesn’t, and keep your palate pleased!

              News and Upcoming Events

    • Dr. Loren Cordain to speak in Las Vegas, Nevada: On November 6, Dr. Cordain will address the American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM) and present “Dietary Mechanisms of Autoimmunity”.

    • Dr. Loren Cordain to speak in Orlando, Florida: On November 10, Dr. Cordain will address the Optometric Nutrition Society. He will be presenting “The Origins and Evolution of the Western Diet: Health Implications for the 21st Century and “Implementing the Paleo Diet with Contemporary Foods”.

    • Congratulations to Nell Stephenson: Nell, our resident Paleo expert, competed in the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii last Saturday, October 10th. In the 35/W35-39 age/division, Nell was 7th in her age group with a total time of 10:47:41. That breaks down into Swim: 1:19:13, Bike: 5:36:17 and Run: 3:44:08. Great job, Nell!

    • What would you like to see in The Paleo Diet Update? We’re upgrading this newsletter to bring you the very best, most scientifically valid, cutting-edge publication exploring how diet affects health, and prevents and reverses disease. We’re adding new content, and are planning exciting topics. Here’s your chance to add to the Update – please send your suggestions and tell me what you would like to see!
              Our Recommendations

    • Still looking for a reputable cure for acne among all the acne cures out there? Since Dr. Cordain was the lead author of a 2002 article explaining what causes and cures acne, there have been at least 17 subsequent, peer-reviewed articles showing that diet can indeed cure acne.

      “This book explains how yet another 'disease' can be cured by removing the cause, it has worked for me and loads of others…and it's the very first thing dermatologists should be prescribing. My inflammation screeched to a halt within 10 days and my non-inflammatory acne is getting clearer and clearer as the weeks wear on. Your body needs time to adjust and heal, it won’t happen overnight, but neither do most medications or topicals and they don't get to the root of the problem. If you're suffering, I urge you to buy this and take the first step to clear skin…"

      Jay

      Even if you’ve already tried every remedy out there, don’t give up. The reason other treatments fail is because they didn’t treat the immediate causes of acne:

      When people have acne, corneocytes (the outer layer of skin cells) will stick together if the cell connectors called desmosomes remain intact. And, this happens because of diet.

      Most people with acne are producing excess sebum, and that is also influenced by diet.

      Plus, everyone who has acne has underlying inflammation, and that too is influenced by diet.

      Based on science and clinical trials, The Dietary Cure for Acne stops the processes that cause acne, and promotes optimum health in your skin and throughout the rest of your body. In fact, most who try it are almost as thrilled with the beneficial side effects (such as weight loss, improved athletic stamina, relief from painful conditions, etc.) as they are with the elimination of their acne, and their new clear skin.

      “If you are a parent or friend of someone who suffers through this condition, you are doing them a disservice by not giving them this…"

      R.B.

    • Can diet replace aspirin and sleeping pills? Here’s a report we just received of how the Paleo Diet put an end to frequent migraines and sleepless nights:

      “About 5 months ago I decided to make the big change in my life. It ended up being a change for my entire family.

      We are a very active family. We all love to hike. I help coach my 8-year-old’s soccer team, and my daughter does soccer and gymnastics. I did not make this change because I wanted to lose weight, although it is a great benefit. I made this change because of the constant battle I have had with migraines. With every child, my migraines became more frequent and more intense. I have done all the food testing, seasoning testing, medicines, etc. I did not want to live like that anymore…It affected everyone in my household. So, after hearing much about Paleo and reading the book, I decided that it was well worth a try.

      After the first week, something major changed for me – I was sleeping. I have had to take meds to sleep for longer than I care to remember. After the second week, something more incredible happened – my energy level was incredibly higher. From there, it was all good.

      I started exercising more because I had the energy. My 5-year-old was taking walks with me 3 times a week. The best part was that my headaches were gone. With no headaches, no migraines, I felt like I was 10 years younger. Ok, maybe that was not the best part – the best part was my kids noticing how much more I could keep up with them.

      Changing our household to eat properly has changed all of our lives. The huge bonus is that I have lost 15 lbs as well. Now, that is the type of bonus I like. Thank you Dr. Cordain – you and your book have changed the lives of my family for the better, for life.”

      Yvonne H.

      Want to see out how the Paleo Diet can help you? The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet for Athletes are available at www.ThePaleoDiet.com/store.shtml.

              Follow Up and Feedback – Insulin Resistance and Fructose

    In this section, we’ll share readers’ concerns and questions about nutrition and the Paleo Diet to help you better understand how to use the diet to optimize your health and fitness.

    We recently received this question:

    ”I read in a recent Paleo Diet Update that if you’re overweight and not active, you may have to limit fruits. Can you please explain more about that?”

    You may need to limit fruit intake due to insulin resistance, which is very common. Besides fruit, many people also eat a lot of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, which upregulate the glucose transporter GLUT 5 and the liver enzyme fructokinase. People with a long history of high fructose intake (especially those who suffer from some of the diseases caused by high fructose like insulin resistance, high triglycerides, high uric acid, etc.) should restrict fructose intake for a few weeks to downregulate GLUT 5 and fructokinase. Then, they can start more normal fructose intake – that’s no more than 40-50 grams/day.

    You can see the fructose consumption of various fruits on our website at www.ThePaleoDiet.com/nutritional_tools/fruits.shtml.

    Although we can't answer every question personally due to the number of letters received, we are very interested in hearing your thoughts, learning about your experiences, and understanding your questions. Many of the questions that we receive will be answered in future newsletters.

    Talk to you next week!

    To your optimum health,

    Wiley Long, M.S., Nutrition and Exercise Science

    Editor

    References:

    1. Aisen PS, Davis KL. (1997). The search for disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Neurology 1997 May;48(5 Suppl 6):S35-41.

    2. McNaull BB, Todd S, McGuinness B, Passmore AP. (2009) Inflammation and Anti-Inflammatory Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease – A Mini-Review. Gerontology, 2009 Sep 10. [Epub ahead of print].

    3. Basak S, Kim H, Kearns JD, Tergaonkar V, O'Dea E, Werner SL, Benedict CA, Ware CF, Ghosh G, Verma IM, Hoffmann A. (2007). A fourth IkappaB protein within the NF-kappaB signaling module. Cell 2007 Jan 26;128(2):369-81.

    4. Inflammation, Heart Disease and Stroke: The Role of C-Reactive Protein. Retrieved September 22, 2009, from American Heart Association Web site: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4648.

    5. Maes M, Coucke F, Leunis JC. Normalization of the increased translocation of endotoxin from gram negative enterobacteria (leaky gut) is accompanied by a remission of chronic fatigue syndrome. Neuro endocrinology letters 2007;28(6):739-44.

    6. Gee JM, Wal JM, Miller K, et al. Effect of saponin on the transmucosal passage of beta-lactoglobulin across the proximal small intestine of normal and beta-lactoglobulin-sensitised rats. Toxicology 1997;117(2-3):219-28.

    7. Keukens EA, de Vrije T, van den Boom C, et al. Molecular basis of glycoalkaloid induced membrane disruption. Biochimica et biophysica acta 1995;1240(2):216-28.

    8. Cordain L, Toohey L, Smith MJ, Hickey MS. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. The British journal of nutrition 2000;83(3):207-17.

     

     

    Subscribe to The Paleo Diet Update

      Paleo Diet Enterprises LLC
      2261 Shawnee Ct., Suite 101
      Fort Collins, CO 80525
      www.ThePaleoDiet.com
      www.DietaryAcneCure.com

      Posted via email from sl26mi

      Caffeine Can Decrease Insulin Sensitivity in Humans — Diabetes Care

      Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 11:34 am

      http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/25/2/364.full

      Posted via email from sl26mi

      October 15, 2009

      Wheat: one of the worst foods when you want clear acne-free skin

      Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 6:09 am

      From a letter from Wiley Long (Dietary Cure for Acne / The Paloe Diet)

      From: Wiley Long and The Dietary Cure for Acne <Wiley@dietaryacnecure.com>
      Date: 2009/10/14
      Subject: What common food exacerbates acne?
      To: Stephen 

      Hi Stephen,

      Wheat is one of the worst foods you can eat when you want clear skin

      Even after you’ve read The Dietary Cure for Acne, I’d love to hear about any questions you may still have, and how it is working for you. Although I can’t answer all questions personally, I will be answering some in these updates. Just let me know at support@DietaryAcneCure.com, and your questions may be discussed in future emails.

      Here’s just such a concern from a client:

      ”I’m going to a dinner party and they are serving spaghetti and meatballs. The spaghetti is from durum flour, which only has a glycemic index of 27! I have read the book, but can you tell me again why this wouldn't be good for the diet?”

      Yes, you’re right. This type of pasta is more slowly digested that most breads and other forms of grain, so it does have a lower glycemic index. Unfortunately, it is still made from wheat, and wheat contains a lectin called wheat germ agglutin or WGA.

      This is a protein that can enter into circulation and ultimately bind to cells throughout your body, affecting skin proliferation, and desquamation (the shedding of outer skin layers). Lectins act like super glue in the body, and can bind and potentially disrupt normal function in almost all of the body’s cells.

      Lectins may also exacerbate acne by inhibiting ZAG. This is an enzyme that normally dissolves proteins that hold skin cells together, so this promotes pore blockage. And, lectins also increase IL-1 alpha and other inflammatory hormones. Plus, lectins impair normal zinc metabolism, and low zinc concentrations in the bloodstream promote inflammation.

      You can see the difference wheat makes to clear skin yourself, just like Pete.

      ”You encouraged me to try The Dietary Cure for Acne to control my acne. I've been eating the way you've outlined in your book and my face is amazingly clear. My only breakouts occur after a dietary slip-up (usually wheat or dairy). I've turned several other acne sufferers onto this way of eating and they've all seen drastic improvements. Thanks so much!!"

      Pete

      Based on science and clinical trials, The Dietary Cure for Acne is a natural way to stop acne before it starts. You can stop the processes that cause acne, and promote optimum health in your skin and throughout the rest of your body.

      In fact, most who try it are almost as thrilled with the beneficial side effects (such as weight loss, improved athletic stamina, relief from painful conditions, etc.) as they are with the elimination of their acne, and their new clear skin.

      ”Our 15-year-old son is a competitive swimmer, and has had acne for several years. Several weeks ago, we decided it was time to help him to eat The Dietary Cure for Acne. His acne has cleared up like unbelievable.

      Last weekend, he had a big invitational meet. He swam like never before in his 6 years of competition. All who saw his times were amazed. His coach said, ‘he was racing.’ He is already lean, anyway. But in these past few weeks, he is looking more fit than ever. It is as though his muscles are more obvious, especially in his back.”

      Teresa

      Changing eating habits can sometimes be a challenge, and many of our clients have been asking us for additional help. They want help with what to eat, and how to implement this way of eating into a busy lifestyle. The Complete Acne Elimination Program gives you the quickest way possible to virtually guarantee yourself clear skin six weeks from today.

      With this program, you will have access to your ebook immediately. Then, we’ll rush you the paperback book along with even more tools to ensure that your acne is eliminated permanently.

      The Quickstart Guide you will receive will help you begin the process that will soon eliminate your acne starting with your very next meal.

      The Dietary Cure for Acne Eating Guide has 80 pages of step-by-step instructions – making it easy to figure out what to eat, what to shop for at the grocery, how to quickly prepare food, and what to order when eating out. The Eating Guide includes:

      • 63 easy-to-follow recipes with 16 seafood dishes, 18 meat dishes, 16 vegetable dishes, 4 breakfasts, and 9 sauces and marinades

      • 180 meal ideas

      • Food lists explaining which foods we recommend, foods you definitely want to avoid, and foods that may want to experiment with occasionally

      • A 30 day meal plan with weekly grocery shopping lists, meal planners, and a food log for a month
      To help you fully understand the scientific basis for The Dietary Cure for Acne, you will receive a one-hour DVD of a lecture Dr. Cordain gave to interested scientists, nutritionists, and physicians, titled Acne Vulgaris: A Disease of Western Civilization – Understanding The Dietary Cure for Acne. Here he reveals the exact mechanisms involved in the formation of acne, and how wrong food choices are the ultimate cause of this disease.

      You will also receive an mp3 copy of a 90-minute Diet and Acne Teleseminar that Dr. Cordain conducted, in which he answered questions directly from readers like you.

      Diet and Acne: New Findings – In this scientifically referenced 23-page report, Dr. Cordain explains some of the newer scientific findings, particularly how dairy may affect the initiation and progression of acne.

      Dietary Cure for Acne Interview with Dr. Cordain – a written transcript that provides an overview of the program and how it works.

      Frequently Asked Questions – a collection of the 16 most commonly asked questions we’ve received from the thousands of people who have already gone through the program. Dr. Cordain answers questions about flax oil, nuts, nutritional supplements, excessive weight loss, dairy, fruit, soy, and more.

      Interview with Dr. Cordain mp3 – This is a wide-ranging interview in which Dr. Cordain discusses the overall health impact of eating this way, how the diet may be modified for high-training endurance athletes, and specifically how it works to eliminate acne.

      Periodic Updates – new relevant science, tips, and success stories

      The comments below are typical of what comes in from those in the program.

      I have a lot more energy, I’ve lost weight, and somebody said I’m positively glowing. It’s working very well. Also I’m sleeping. I haven’t slept well in 25 years. Maybe that’s why I’m glowing.”

      Ronnie

      Go to www.DietaryAcneCure.com/complete.htm to get the program while it’s still on sale.

      Best regards,

      Wiley Long – The Dietary Cure for Acne

      www.DietaryAcneCure.com

      P.S. – The Complete Acne Elimination Program is a bargain at just $197. (Most people will spend more than that on acne treatments every 6 months.) But if you order now, you can get it for just $116.95. Most importantly, if this program does not work for you, return it for a full refund.

      Paleo Diet Enterprises LLC
      2261 Shawnee Ct., Suite 101
      Fort Collins, CO 80525
      www.ThePaleoDiet.com
      www.DietaryAcneCure.com

      Posted via email from sl26mi

      October 9, 2009

      Improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet – European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2009)

      Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 10:53 pm

      L A Frassetto, M Schloetter, M Mietus-Synder, R C Morris Jr and A Sebastian (2009)


      Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type

      diet. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2009) 63, 947–955; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2009.4; published online 11 February 2009.


      Summary of paper by W.Long:


      "A study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition acknowledged that the contemporary American diet fuels numerous chronic diseases. The study then compared the results of participants eating their usual diet with the effects of changing to a paleolithic diet. The paleolithic diet provided metabolic and physiologic improvements in a matter of days.

      How participants changed their diet

      Nine sedentary, but not obese, healthy volunteers joined a metabolically-controlled study as outpatients. Their weight was checked daily to ensure there was no weight loss.

      The participants first ate as usual for 3 days. Then, for 7 days, they consumed three ramp-up diets that increased potassium and fiber. They finished the study by eating a paleolithic diet of lean meats, fruits, vegetables and nuts for 10 days.

      What the study measured

      In all of the following measured variables, either eight or all nine participants had identical directional responses when eating a paleolithic diet. The study looked at:

      • Arterial blood pressure (BP)

      • 24-hour urine sodium and potassium excretion

      • Plasma glucose and insulin areas under the curve (AUC) during a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The glycemic index of a food is defined as the area under the two-hour blood glucose response curve (AUC) following the ingestion of a fixed portion of carbohydrate (usually 50 g).

      • Insulin sensitivity, which generally shows the risk for heart problems

      • Plasma lipid concentrations, which are also used to determine the risk of coronary heart disease, and

      • Brachial artery (the major blood vessel of the upper arm) reactivity in response to ischemia (a restriction in blood supply)

      The improvements in health

      Compared with the participants’ usual diet, even short-term consumption of a paleolithic diet provided:

      • Significant reductions in BP associated with improved arterial distensibility

      • Significant reductions in plasma insulin versus time AUC during the OGTT, and

      • Large significant reductions in total cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglycerides

      Help yourself

      Improve blood pressure

      High blood pressure can remain undetected for years, but it can damage blood vessels, and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. This study showed that consuming the Paleo Diet can improve blood pressure in less than two weeks. Furthermore, studies of hunter-gatherer cultures have shown no age-related rise in blood pressure, a process that is normally considered to be a universal aspect of aging.2

      Fight diabetes and cardiovascular disease

      You can also use this diet to improve glucose tolerance, decrease insulin secretion, and increase insulin sensitivity, as this study found. Impaired glucose tolerance is seen as a pre-diabetic state that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. Insulin sensitivity is also used to measure the risk for heart disease. Generally, greater insulin sensitivity indicates reduced risk of heart problems.

      Reduce risk of atherosclerois

      The Paleo Diet also improved lipid profiles very quickly for healthy, sedentary people. Lipid profiles show total cholesterol, LDL-C that is referred to as “bad” cholesterol, triglycerides, and “good” cholesterol or HDL-C.

      Improving your lipid profiles can reduce your risk for heart attack and stroke caused by blood vessel blockage or hardening of the arteries, also known as atherosclerois".


      SL

      Posted via email from sl26mi

      Study Shows Paleo Diet Improves Health Quickly (The Paleo Diet Update v5, #41)

      Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 9:24 pm

       

      • The Paleo Diet Update

        www.ThePaleoDiet.com
        Loren Cordain, Ph.D.
        Issue: # 2009 – 41 / October 9, 2009

        Stephen,

        Hello! Welcome to The Paleo Diet Update. We focus on new scientific findings that you can use to reduce your risk of disease, increase your daily energy, improve your athletic performance, and maintain your mental and physical vigor in later years.

        Research is verifying that returning to the nutrition our Paleolithic ancestors ate for millions of years provides dramatic improvements in health. Even healthy people have been able to significantly reduce their risk of disease in just a couple of weeks simply by changing their diet.

        In this issue, we take a look at the metabolic and physiologic improvements that resulted (and the benefits you can expect) when participants in a nutrition study switched to a Paleolithic diet. We'll also share ideas on how to include more vegetables in a delicious salad.

        Thanks to Maelán Fontes and Pablo Martinez Ramirez, this update is also available in Spanish.

        Enjoy.

        Loren Cordain, Ph.D.

        In This Issue

        Salads Are Great for
        Increasing Veggies in a Meal
            New Study Shows Paleo Diet Improves Health Quickly             Wiley Long

        A study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition acknowledged that the contemporary American diet fuels numerous chronic diseases. The study then compared the results of participants eating their usual diet with the effects of changing to a paleolithic diet. The paleolithic diet provided metabolic and physiologic improvements in a matter of days.

        How participants changed their diet

        Nine sedentary, but not obese, healthy volunteers joined a metabolically-controlled study as outpatients. Their weight was checked daily to ensure there was no weight loss.

        The participants first ate as usual for 3 days. Then, for 7 days, they consumed three ramp-up diets that increased potassium and fiber. They finished the study by eating a paleolithic diet of lean meats, fruits, vegetables and nuts for 10 days.

        What the study measured

        In all of the following measured variables, either eight or all nine participants had identical directional responses when eating a paleolithic diet. The study looked at:

        • Arterial blood pressure (BP)

        • 24-hour urine sodium and potassium excretion

        • Plasma glucose and insulin areas under the curve (AUC) during a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The glycemic index of a food is defined as the area under the two-hour blood glucose response curve (AUC) following the ingestion of a fixed portion of carbohydrate (usually 50 g).

        • Insulin sensitivity, which generally shows the risk for heart problems

        • Plasma lipid concentrations, which are also used to determine the risk of coronary heart disease, and

        • Brachial artery (the major blood vessel of the upper arm) reactivity in response to ischemia (a restriction in blood supply)

        The improvements in health

        Compared with the participants’ usual diet, even short-term consumption of a paleolithic diet provided:

        • Significant reductions in BP associated with improved arterial distensibility

        • Significant reductions in plasma insulin versus time AUC during the OGTT, and

        • Large significant reductions in total cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglycerides

        Help yourself

        Improve blood pressure

        High blood pressure can remain undetected for years, but it can damage blood vessels, and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. This study showed that consuming the Paleo Diet can improve blood pressure in less than two weeks. Furthermore, studies of hunter-gatherer cultures have shown no age-related rise in blood pressure, a process that is normally considered to be a universal aspect of aging.2

        Fight diabetes and cardiovascular disease

        You can also use this diet to improve glucose tolerance, decrease insulin secretion, and increase insulin sensitivity, as this study found. Impaired glucose tolerance is seen as a pre-diabetic state that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. Insulin sensitivity is also used to measure the risk for heart disease. Generally, greater insulin sensitivity indicates reduced risk of heart problems.

        Reduce risk of atherosclerois

        The Paleo Diet also improved lipid profiles very quickly for healthy, sedentary people. Lipid profiles show total cholesterol, LDL-C that is referred to as “bad” cholesterol, triglycerides, and “good” cholesterol or HDL-C.

        Improving your lipid profiles can reduce your risk for heart attack and stroke caused by blood vessel blockage or hardening of the arteries, also known as atherosclerois.

        Next time, we’ll take a look at how the Paleo Diet fights inflammation, which is involved in almost every disease process. We'll also share tips on how to help you transform recipes to be Paleo.

                  Salads Are Great for Increasing Veggies in a Meal             by Nell Stephenson
        Salads are a great way to get all your veggies in a single meal. You can also include some good fats if you add avocado, flax seed oil, and raw walnuts.

        Raw broccoli adds crunch and powerful phytochemicals to a salad. Besides being colorful, radishes contain vitamin C, sodium and calcium. Shredded cabbage is rich in vitamin A, B, C and E, as well as high iron and sulphur. Onions have antibacterial properties, and are gentle blood thinners. Colorful carrots add crunch like broccoli, and they are rich in beta-carotene.

        The sweetness of fruit can also balance nicely with the savory taste of whatever protein and veggies you may be serving. I like to stick with what is local and in season as much as possible.

        In the summer, I love to add organic strawberries, raw cashews, avocado, red onion, heirloom tomato and basil.

        As the fall rolls around, I may add some raw or roasted pears with pecan and a sprinkle of currants. Apples tossed with lemon and then cinnamon also are a nice twist on an old standard.

        In the winter, citrus fruits or grapes with slivered almonds, poppy seeds and flax meal are tasty.

        In the spring, I love to include edible flowers for color, along with foods giving a hint of the bounty of summer to come! Early season berries are great this time of year along with baby veggies, like broccolini, bok choy, and asparagus. I steam these, and then put them in cold water for a nice spring dish.

        I generally stick with the same choices for dressing – olive oil and freshly squeezed lime juice – but you can vary that as well. Blend your choice of fresh herbs with different types of oils for a different taste. Try walnut oil with tarragon or flax oil infused with rosemary, and get ready for an explosion of sweet and savory all from a single salad!

                  News and Upcoming Events

        • Follow Nell Stephenson at the Ironman World Championships! Our resident Paleo expert on using the Paleo Diet in Ironman competitions will be competing Saturday, Oct 10, at 7 AM Hawaii time! Both Nell and her husband Chris will be competing. You can follow them at www.ironmanlive.com by going to the “Athlete Tracker” function and following Stephenson.

        • Changes are coming! It is our goal to continue to put out the very best, most scientifically valid, cutting edge publication dedicated toward exploring the connection between diet and health (and disease). We have content improvements planned, and some exciting topics coming. In the mean time, please send me any suggestions you have for what you would like to see – I’d love to hear your thoughts and comments!

        • Fruit, vegetables, nuts, and seeds provide antioxidants: The Journal of Nutrition published a cross-sectional analysis of African American men and women participating in a study of diet and physical activity. The researchers recommended increasing consumption of fruit, vegetables, nuts, and seeds to increase total antioxidant capacity. The Paleo Diet is very high in these foods, and thus very nutritionally dense.

        • High-protein diets have been shown to increase energy expenditure: A study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition analyzed a high-protein, carbohydrate-free diet. Researchers concluded that 42 percent of the increase in energy expenditure after the high-protein, carbohydrate-free diet was explained by an increase in gluconeogenesis (one of two main mechanisms the body uses to keep blood glucose levels from dropping too low).

        • Dr. Loren Cordain will speak in Berlin, Germany: On October 13th and14th, Dr. Cordain will present “Human Nutritional Evolution” at the Workshop on Evolution and Diseases of Civilization. This will be held at Humboldt Graduate School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University, Luisenstrasse 56, Berlin, Germany.

                  Our Recommendations

        • Wondering where to start to improve your health? In our Paleo Diet Implementation Program, you’ll get a step-by-step guide on what to eat. This will help you overcome the challenge of what to eat for breakfast, how to grocery shop, and how to prep meals easily and quickly. With easy-to-follow recipes, dining out suggestions, and tips for healthy eating while traveling, you’ll get six consecutive weeks of live teleconference coaching and Q&A support to help you put your new eating habits into practice.

          With readily available modern foods, the Paleo Diet Implementation Program mimics the types of foods every single person on the planet ate prior to the Agricultural Revolution (that’s 99.9% of our genetic history). When people eat the diet we evolved to need, intractable health problems often disappear, excess body fat melts away, the complexion clears, digestion improves, we have more energy, and aches and pains often subside with the body’s natural response to a diet that optimizes functioning and metabolism.

          Here’s one of the reports we’ve received from those who have implemented the program:

          “I had my 70th birthday last April, which brought me to think about my general condition. Although I was eating the same diet as my husband, while he was skinny, I was overweight, suffering from asthma, high blood pressure, a hiatus hernia and high cholesterol. Whatever I did, I could not get rid of the large tummy, and I seemed destined to take steroids and statins for the rest of my life.

          I started the diet. By the end of August, my exercise asthma (which I have had all my life) had gone.

          By October, my blood pressure was coming down and now, one year later, I take no medication for it and have a constant blood pressure that is low to normal. My cholesterol is excellent with very low ‘bad’ cholesterol, so I have given up statins, although my bemused doctor had told me I would have to be on them for life! In fact, from having taken a multitude of pills and potions everyday, I now take none and feel fantastic!

          I have, of course, lost the excess weight and am now stabilized at exactly the same weight as my husband, 63 kilos.

          My hiatus hernia has not given a murmur, and apart from when I indulge in peppers, I have no signs of even the mildest indigestion. I have bags of energy and my muscle strength has improved enormously, I can open jars I could not manage a year ago, and I find ten mile walks up and down steep hills and gorges, no problem! My energy level is fairly constant and I no longer have ‘troughs and highs’ during a day.

          I have found other side effects to the diet: notably my hair (which was getting thinner and starting to grow gray) is now getting thicker and longer and getting darker again. My fingernails are much stronger and smoother and seem to grow faster. My concentration is much improved and my problem solving ability is excellent. Where before I found myself mentally alert at different times of the day, I now find this is constant. I have the feeling that my memory has improved – I don't find names and words escaping me in conversation.

          People who meet me all comment on how well I look and ask me what I am on! Certainly, I do not feel my age and I am more active and fitter than I was 20 years ago.

          Thank you so much for sharing this diet and lifestyle. It really has transformed my life.”

          Hilary R.

        • What’s in milk that increases your risk of inflammation (an underlying factor in most disease)? Here’s our research into what links milk with a host of diseases from The Paleo Diet Update archive:

          Constantly consuming milk from any of these species (or any dairy product with a concomitantly high lactose and protein content) will cause a chronic state of hyperinsulinemia. This can cause insulin resistance13-15, (the primary metabolic defect underlying the metabolic syndrome1), obesity16-18, polycystic ovary syndrome1, increased inflammation19, and can chronically elevate the IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio1, which is implicated in various epithelial cell cancers, acne, juvenile myopia, and other diseases.1

          This research (available in Vol. 4 Issue 20 “Milk and Hyperinsulinemia”), and the entire Paleo Diet Update archive are available online at www.ThePaleoDiet.com/store.shtml.

                  Follow Up and Feedback

        In this section, we’ll share readers’ concerns and questions about nutrition and the Paleo Diet to help you better understand how to use the diet to optimize your health and fitness.

        We recently received this request:

        “My family and I have been following the Paleo lifestyle for about two months now. I am 38, my wife is 40, our daughter is 9, and our son who falls under the autism blanket of disorders is 11, soon to be 12.

        The lifestyle change has been positive for us all. Our son in particular has responded well, and his allergies have completely disappeared. We suspected a gluten and/or casein intolerance that was reinforced by the improvements in his behavior and his allergies with Paleo. My wife and I have weight to lose, and it is coming off fast. Our daughter is not overweight, but carries a little body fat so her small amount of weight loss is okay as long as she doesn't lose too much. I expect she will level out soon. Our son however is very lean at 82 lbs. This is a direct result of the medications he is on – Concerta and Stratera.

        We have always struggled to keep his weight up and the new Paleo lifestyle hasn't changed this unfortunately. We were successful in packing on two pounds one week, however this was short lived and he continues to drop 1-1.5 lbs per week. We have increased his food intake where possible, but because his appetite is suppressed from the medications, it is difficult to get him to eat. Any suggestions as to how we should best approach putting the right kind of weight on him would be helpful and appreciated for two very concerned parents.”

        We would recommend to increase the caloric intake with good fats such as olive oil, avocados and nuts. Also, emphasize high-glycemic fruits (such as bananas and grapes), and dried fruit (such as dates, raisins, and dried figs) especially during 30 minutes after exercise. You don't want to produce hyperinsulinemia because it may be related to autism, so do this especially after exercise. Then, the rest of the day eat fresh fruits. We also recommend that you use a supplement of branched-chain amino acids and take 2-3 grams a day. If getting enough calories continues to be a problem, you may also consider fattier cuts of meat.

        Although we can't answer every question personally due to the number of letters received, we are very interested in hearing your thoughts, learning about your experiences, and understanding your questions. Many of the questions that we receive will be answered in future newsletters.

        Talk to you next week!

        To your optimum health,

        Wiley Long, M.S., Nutrition and Exercise Science

        Editor

        References:

        1. Frassetto LA, Schloetter M, Mietus-Synder M, Morris RC, Jr., Sebastian A: Metabolic and physiologic improvements from consuming a paleolithic, hunter-gatherer type diet. Eur J Clin Nutr 2009. Website: http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v63/n8/abs/ejcn20094a.html.

        2. Oliver WJ, Cohen EL, Neel JV. Blood pressure, sodium intake, and sodium related hormones in the Yanomamo Indians, a “no-salt” culture. Circulation. 1975 Jul;52(1):146-51.

         

         

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          Posted via email from sl26mi

          October 8, 2009

          Holden pursues US police market – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

          Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 7:32 pm

          http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/10/06/2705711.htm?section=business

          Your BMW F800GS or R1200GSA could soon be pursued through the northern Cascades by an Aussie made police car..:-)

          ( A bit quicker than Crown Victorias..  🙂

          S

          cc PiRiders etc

          Posted via email from sl26mi

          Catalyst: Virtual Clinic – ABC TV Science (treating depression)

          Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 6:58 pm

          http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/2708750.htm

          Posted via email from sl26mi

          Catalyst: WiFi Windfall – ABC TV Science

          Filed under: Uncategorized — SL @ 6:55 pm

          http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/2708730.htm

          NARRATION
          This is the story of how a small group of Australian scientists beat the world’s heaviest computer hitters to one of the biggest inventions of our time.

          Dennis Redfern
          Its one of the most important inventions that Australians have made.

          Posted via email from sl26mi

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